MAIN STUFF

The Greatest Hoax in the World; PDF
TGHITW Presentation Files



IMPORTANT

EXTINCTION STUFF

Dinosaur Extinction: 921 billion Hiroshima A-bombs
Dinosaur Extinction Theories
Dinosaur Extinction: The Meteor Theory
Rock Solid Evidence for the Meteor Theory
Meteor Extinction Theory a Complete Fantasy
Backpedalling Evolutionists / The Great Dinosaur Extinction Cover-up
The Great Avian Dinosaur Bird Mystery
Fossil of Oldest Living Paleocene Bird Found
This just doesn't make any sense!
THE NUMBERS GAME

BREAKING NEWS: Fossilized animals found in Karoo Formation larger than a cow!
Stephen's COVID-safe Dinosaurs
or
Too Many Dinosaurs in the Early Jurassic!

Dinosaurs Starving in the Early Jurassic
WEIRD STUFF

Mysterious New Science Mentioned at Founding of Movement
Founder of Weird Movement Realizes Evolution More Absurd
Letter of Support to School Board
EVOLUTION

The Mumbo Jumbo Magic of Evolution
Proof of Evolution? The Search for the Mole-Bird
Proof of Evolution? The Search for the Fish-Bird
World's Longest Running Evolution Experiment A Complete Bust?
Evolution: The Fill-in-the-Blanks Theory
Evolutionists Redefine "Fact"
REALLY CRAZY STUFF

Stephen's Non-Avian Dino-Free Drinking Water: Contains no T-Rex piss
Stephen's Nuclear Blast Shelter Construction
Stephen's Termite Mound Farming Program
Stephen's Rent-a-Badger
COMPLETELY BONKERS

Craters on the Moon??? The Evolutionists must be really desperate!



HUMOUR

For this month we have ...
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."

REFERENCES
Suppose I need something here...

Dead Darwin Fish
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variations_of_the_ichthys_symbol#Parodies
http://creationwiki.org/File:Dead_Darwin_Fish_large.png
Author: Cale Burr
Public Domain

Humour
So far all in Public Domain.
Mainly from an old book about dinosaurs.
I have rewritten most of the comments giving a more modern setting or hopefully more humorous. These cartoons date back to approximately 1945.

Exception is Bottosaurus. That one's mine.

This is the refs for bottosaurus!

Bottosaurus
Temporal range: Maastrichtian – Paleocene
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Order: Crocodilia
Family: Alligatoridae
Bottosaurus is an extinct genus of alligatoroid from the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene of New Jersey, North and South Carolina. Three species are currently known.
The genus is predominantly found from Late Cretaceous strata of Maastrichtian age, such as the Hornerstown Formation and New Jersey Greensands. New material has been found from the Rhems and Williamsburg Formations of the Black Mingo Group of the South Carolina coastal plain that dates back to the Danian and Thanetian stages of the Paleocene epoch, respectively, shows that Bottosaurus had survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event and lived through much of the early Paleogene period in these localities before finally becoming extinct somewhere around the end of the Paleocene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottosaurus

Bottosaurus Agassiz 1849 (crocodile)
Age range: 70.6 to 55.8 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=65785

OK I didn't have any luck finding a bottosaurus pic I could use so instead used another similar looking creature, a crocodyliform, Bernissartia. It's not in the same time line but it should do for a pic:

Bernissartia
Temporal range: Early Cretaceous, 130-110 Ma
Clade: Neosuchia
Family: Bernissartiidae
Genus: Bernissartia
Bernissartia ('of Bernissart') is an extinct genus of neosuchian crocodyliform that lived in the Early Cretaceous, around 130 million years ago.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernissartia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bernissartia_BW.jpg
Bernissartia fagesii from the Early cretaceous of Southern England and Belgium, digital
Attribution: Nobu Tamura aka Arthur Weasly
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Crocodyliformes
Temporal range: Late Triassic–Recent, 225–0 Ma
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Clade: Crocodyliformes
Crocodyliformes is a clade of crurotarsan archosaurs, the group often traditionally referred to as "crocodilians".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocodyliformes

And the other two animals used were Torosaurus and Ankylosaurus:

Torosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Torosaurus ("perforated lizard", in reference to the large openings in its frill) is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous period, between 68 and 66 million years ago, though it is possible that the species range might extend to as far as 69 million years ago.
From head to tail, Torosaurus is thought to have measured about 8 to 9 m (26 to 30 ft) long and weighed four to six tonnes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torosaurus

Torosaurus
Pronunciation: tor-oh-SORE-us
Name meaning: 'bull lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 70-65 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: ceratopsian
Length: 7.5m
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/torosaurus.html

Torosaurus Marsh 1891 (ceratopsid)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38861

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Torosaurus_BW.jpg
Torosaurus latus, a ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous of North America, pencil drawing, digital coloring
Attribution: Nobu Tamura
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Ankylosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Ankylosaurus is a genus of armored dinosaur. Its fossils have been found in geological formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America, making it among the last of the non-avian dinosaurs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ankylosaurus

Ankylosaurus
Pronunciation: an-KIE-loh-sore-us
Name meaning: 'stiff lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 74-67 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: armoured dinosaur
Length: 7.0m
Weight: 4000kg
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/ankylosaurus.html

Ankylosaurus Brown 1908 (ornithischian)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38837

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:202007_Ankylosaurus_magniventris.svg
Attribution: DataBase Center for Life Science (DBCLS)
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

This is the refs for bottosaurus!

Bottosaurus
Temporal range: Maastrichtian – Paleocene
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Order: Crocodilia
Family: Alligatoridae
Bottosaurus is an extinct genus of alligatoroid from the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene of New Jersey, North and South Carolina. Three species are currently known.
The genus is predominantly found from Late Cretaceous strata of Maastrichtian age, such as the Hornerstown Formation and New Jersey Greensands. New material has been found from the Rhems and Williamsburg Formations of the Black Mingo Group of the South Carolina coastal plain that dates back to the Danian and Thanetian stages of the Paleocene epoch, respectively, shows that Bottosaurus had survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event and lived through much of the early Paleogene period in these localities before finally becoming extinct somewhere around the end of the Paleocene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottosaurus

Bottosaurus Agassiz 1849 (crocodile)
Age range: 70.6 to 55.8 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=65785

OK I didn't have any luck finding a bottosaurus pic I could use so instead used another similar looking creature, a crocodyliform, Bernissartia. It's not in the same time line but it should do for a pic:

Bernissartia
Temporal range: Early Cretaceous, 130-110 Ma
Clade: Neosuchia
Family: Bernissartiidae
Genus: Bernissartia
Bernissartia ('of Bernissart') is an extinct genus of neosuchian crocodyliform that lived in the Early Cretaceous, around 130 million years ago.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernissartia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bernissartia_BW.jpg
Bernissartia fagesii from the Early cretaceous of Southern England and Belgium, digital
Attribution: Nobu Tamura aka Arthur Weasly
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Crocodyliformes
Temporal range: Late Triassic–Recent, 225–0 Ma
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Clade: Crocodyliformes
Crocodyliformes is a clade of crurotarsan archosaurs, the group often traditionally referred to as "crocodilians".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocodyliformes

And the other two animals used were Torosaurus and Ankylosaurus:

Torosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Torosaurus ("perforated lizard", in reference to the large openings in its frill) is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous period, between 68 and 66 million years ago, though it is possible that the species range might extend to as far as 69 million years ago.
From head to tail, Torosaurus is thought to have measured about 8 to 9 m (26 to 30 ft) long and weighed four to six tonnes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torosaurus

Torosaurus
Pronunciation: tor-oh-SORE-us
Name meaning: 'bull lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 70-65 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: ceratopsian
Length: 7.5m
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/torosaurus.html

Torosaurus Marsh 1891 (ceratopsid)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38861

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Torosaurus_BW.jpg
Torosaurus latus, a ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous of North America, pencil drawing, digital coloring
Attribution: Nobu Tamura
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Ankylosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Ankylosaurus is a genus of armored dinosaur. Its fossils have been found in geological formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America, making it among the last of the non-avian dinosaurs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ankylosaurus

Ankylosaurus
Pronunciation: an-KIE-loh-sore-us
Name meaning: 'stiff lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 74-67 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: armoured dinosaur
Length: 7.0m
Weight: 4000kg
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/ankylosaurus.html

Ankylosaurus Brown 1908 (ornithischian)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38837

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:202007_Ankylosaurus_magniventris.svg
Attribution: DataBase Center for Life Science (DBCLS)
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

Top
Stephen Robert Buckley
E-mail: stephen [at] greatesthoax.info
Last revised: 10 Aug 2021.
First construction: 22 Oct 2020.
Note: humour section updates differently.

Page design/construction Stephen Buckley 2020.





Image:header

MAIN

The Greatest Hoax in the World; PDF
TGHITW Presentation Files



IMPORTANT

EXTINCTION STUFF

Dinosaur Extinction: 921 billion Hiroshima A-bombs
Dinosaur Extinction Theories
Dinosaur Extinction: The Meteor Theory
Rock Solid Evidence for the Meteor Theory
Meteor Extinction Theory a Complete Fantasy
Backpedalling Evolutionists / The Great Dinosaur Extinction Cover-up
The Great Avian Dinosaur Bird Mystery
Fossil of Oldest Living Paleocene Bird Found
This just doesn't make any sense!
THE NUMBERS GAME

BREAKING NEWS: Fossilized animals found in Karoo Formation larger than a cow!
Stephen's COVID-safe Dinosaurs
or
Too Many Dinosaurs in the Early Jurassic!

Dinosaurs Starving in the Early Jurassic
WEIRD STUFF

Mysterious New Science Mentioned at Founding of Movement
Founder of Weird Movement Realizes Evolution More Absurd
Letter of Support to School Board
EVOLUTION

The Mumbo Jumbo Magic of Evolution
Proof of Evolution? The Search for the Mole-Bird
Proof of Evolution? The Search for the Fish-Bird
World's Longest Running Evolution Experiment A Complete Bust?
Evolution: The Fill-in-the-Blanks Theory
Evolutionists Redefine "Fact"
REALLY CRAZY STUFF

Stephen's Non-Avian Dino-Free Drinking Water: Contains no T-Rex piss
Stephen's Nuclear Blast Shelter Construction
Stephen's Termite Mound Farming Program
Stephen's Rent-a-Badger
COMPLETELY BONKERS

Craters on the Moon??? The Evolutionists must be really desperate!



HUMOUR

For this month we have ...
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."

REFERENCES
Suppose I need something here...

Dead Darwin Fish
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variations_of_the_ichthys_symbol#Parodies
http://creationwiki.org/File:Dead_Darwin_Fish_large.png
Author: Cale Burr
Public Domain

Humour
So far all in Public Domain.
Mainly from an old book about dinosaurs.
I have rewritten most of the comments giving a more modern setting or hopefully more humorous. These cartoons date back to approximately 1945.

Exception is Bottosaurus. That one's mine.

This is the refs for bottosaurus!

Bottosaurus
Temporal range: Maastrichtian – Paleocene
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Order: Crocodilia
Family: Alligatoridae
Bottosaurus is an extinct genus of alligatoroid from the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene of New Jersey, North and South Carolina. Three species are currently known.
The genus is predominantly found from Late Cretaceous strata of Maastrichtian age, such as the Hornerstown Formation and New Jersey Greensands. New material has been found from the Rhems and Williamsburg Formations of the Black Mingo Group of the South Carolina coastal plain that dates back to the Danian and Thanetian stages of the Paleocene epoch, respectively, shows that Bottosaurus had survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event and lived through much of the early Paleogene period in these localities before finally becoming extinct somewhere around the end of the Paleocene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottosaurus

Bottosaurus Agassiz 1849 (crocodile)
Age range: 70.6 to 55.8 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=65785

OK I didn't have any luck finding a bottosaurus pic I could use so instead used another similar looking creature, a crocodyliform, Bernissartia. It's not in the same time line but it should do for a pic:

Bernissartia
Temporal range: Early Cretaceous, 130-110 Ma
Clade: Neosuchia
Family: Bernissartiidae
Genus: Bernissartia
Bernissartia ('of Bernissart') is an extinct genus of neosuchian crocodyliform that lived in the Early Cretaceous, around 130 million years ago.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernissartia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bernissartia_BW.jpg
Bernissartia fagesii from the Early cretaceous of Southern England and Belgium, digital
Attribution: Nobu Tamura aka Arthur Weasly
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Crocodyliformes
Temporal range: Late Triassic–Recent, 225–0 Ma
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Clade: Crocodyliformes
Crocodyliformes is a clade of crurotarsan archosaurs, the group often traditionally referred to as "crocodilians".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocodyliformes

And the other two animals used were Torosaurus and Ankylosaurus:

Torosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Torosaurus ("perforated lizard", in reference to the large openings in its frill) is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous period, between 68 and 66 million years ago, though it is possible that the species range might extend to as far as 69 million years ago.
From head to tail, Torosaurus is thought to have measured about 8 to 9 m (26 to 30 ft) long and weighed four to six tonnes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torosaurus

Torosaurus
Pronunciation: tor-oh-SORE-us
Name meaning: 'bull lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 70-65 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: ceratopsian
Length: 7.5m
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/torosaurus.html

Torosaurus Marsh 1891 (ceratopsid)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38861

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Torosaurus_BW.jpg
Torosaurus latus, a ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous of North America, pencil drawing, digital coloring
Attribution: Nobu Tamura
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Ankylosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Ankylosaurus is a genus of armored dinosaur. Its fossils have been found in geological formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America, making it among the last of the non-avian dinosaurs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ankylosaurus

Ankylosaurus
Pronunciation: an-KIE-loh-sore-us
Name meaning: 'stiff lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 74-67 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: armoured dinosaur
Length: 7.0m
Weight: 4000kg
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/ankylosaurus.html

Ankylosaurus Brown 1908 (ornithischian)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38837

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:202007_Ankylosaurus_magniventris.svg
Attribution: DataBase Center for Life Science (DBCLS)
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

This is the refs for bottosaurus!

Bottosaurus
Temporal range: Maastrichtian – Paleocene
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Order: Crocodilia
Family: Alligatoridae
Bottosaurus is an extinct genus of alligatoroid from the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene of New Jersey, North and South Carolina. Three species are currently known.
The genus is predominantly found from Late Cretaceous strata of Maastrichtian age, such as the Hornerstown Formation and New Jersey Greensands. New material has been found from the Rhems and Williamsburg Formations of the Black Mingo Group of the South Carolina coastal plain that dates back to the Danian and Thanetian stages of the Paleocene epoch, respectively, shows that Bottosaurus had survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event and lived through much of the early Paleogene period in these localities before finally becoming extinct somewhere around the end of the Paleocene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottosaurus

Bottosaurus Agassiz 1849 (crocodile)
Age range: 70.6 to 55.8 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=65785

OK I didn't have any luck finding a bottosaurus pic I could use so instead used another similar looking creature, a crocodyliform, Bernissartia. It's not in the same time line but it should do for a pic:

Bernissartia
Temporal range: Early Cretaceous, 130-110 Ma
Clade: Neosuchia
Family: Bernissartiidae
Genus: Bernissartia
Bernissartia ('of Bernissart') is an extinct genus of neosuchian crocodyliform that lived in the Early Cretaceous, around 130 million years ago.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernissartia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bernissartia_BW.jpg
Bernissartia fagesii from the Early cretaceous of Southern England and Belgium, digital
Attribution: Nobu Tamura aka Arthur Weasly
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Crocodyliformes
Temporal range: Late Triassic–Recent, 225–0 Ma
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Clade: Crocodyliformes
Crocodyliformes is a clade of crurotarsan archosaurs, the group often traditionally referred to as "crocodilians".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocodyliformes

And the other two animals used were Torosaurus and Ankylosaurus:

Torosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Torosaurus ("perforated lizard", in reference to the large openings in its frill) is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous period, between 68 and 66 million years ago, though it is possible that the species range might extend to as far as 69 million years ago.
From head to tail, Torosaurus is thought to have measured about 8 to 9 m (26 to 30 ft) long and weighed four to six tonnes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torosaurus

Torosaurus
Pronunciation: tor-oh-SORE-us
Name meaning: 'bull lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 70-65 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: ceratopsian
Length: 7.5m
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/torosaurus.html

Torosaurus Marsh 1891 (ceratopsid)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38861

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Torosaurus_BW.jpg
Torosaurus latus, a ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous of North America, pencil drawing, digital coloring
Attribution: Nobu Tamura
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Ankylosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Ankylosaurus is a genus of armored dinosaur. Its fossils have been found in geological formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America, making it among the last of the non-avian dinosaurs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ankylosaurus

Ankylosaurus
Pronunciation: an-KIE-loh-sore-us
Name meaning: 'stiff lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 74-67 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: armoured dinosaur
Length: 7.0m
Weight: 4000kg
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/ankylosaurus.html

Ankylosaurus Brown 1908 (ornithischian)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38837

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:202007_Ankylosaurus_magniventris.svg
Attribution: DataBase Center for Life Science (DBCLS)
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

Top
Stephen Robert Buckley
E-mail: stephen [at] greatesthoax.info
Last revised: 10 Aug 2021.
First construction: 22 Oct 2020.
Note: humour section updates differently.

Page design/construction Stephen Buckley 2020.



Image:Dead Darwin Fish
Image:Dead Darwin Fish
Image:Dead Darwin Fish


MAIN

The Greatest Hoax in the World; PDF

TGHITW Presentation Files


IMPORTANT

EXTINCTION STUFF

Dinosaur Extinction: 921 billion Hiroshima A-bombs

Dinosaur Extinction Theories

Dinosaur Extinction: The Meteor Theory

Rock Solid Evidence for the Meteor Theory

Meteor Extinction Theory a Complete Fantasy

Backpedalling Evolutionists / The Great Dinosaur Extinction Cover-up

The Great Avian Dinosaur Bird Mystery

Fossil of Oldest Living Paleocene Bird Found

This just doesn't make any sense!

THE NUMBERS GAME

BREAKING NEWS: Fossilized animals found in Karoo Formation larger than a cow!

Too Many Dinosaurs in the Early Jurassic!

Dinosaurs Starving in the Early Jurassic

WEIRD STUFF

Mysterious New Science Mentioned at Founding of Movement

Founder of Weird Movement Realizes Evolution More Absurd

Letter of Support to School Board

EVOLUTION

The Mumbo Jumbo Magic of Evolution

Proof of Evolution? The Search for the Mole-Bird

Proof of Evolution? The Search for the Fish-Bird

World's Longest Running Evolution Experiment A Complete Bust?

Evolution: The Fill-in-the-Blanks Theory

Evolutionists Redefine "Fact"

REALLY CRAZY STUFF

Stephen's Non-Avian Dino-Free Drinking Water: Contains no T-Rex piss

Stephen's Nuclear Blast Shelter Construction

Stephen's Termite Mound Farming Program

Stephen's Rent-a-Badger

COMPLETELY BONKERS

Craters on the Moon??? The Evolutionists must be really desperate!


HUMOUR

For this month we have ...
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."
Pat a Brontosaurus
Image:Large herbivorous dinosaur plus people in museum
"There was a lot of arguing about the name. So we are labelling it Pat-a-Brontosaurus. The kids will like that."

REFERENCES
Suppose I need something here...

Dead Darwin Fish
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variations_of_the_ichthys_symbol#Parodies
http://creationwiki.org/File:Dead_Darwin_Fish_large.png
Author: Cale Burr
Public Domain

Humour
So far all in Public Domain.
Mainly from an old book about dinosaurs.
I have rewritten most of the comments giving a more modern setting or hopefully more humorous. These cartoons date back to approximately 1945.

Exception is Bottosaurus. That one's mine.

This is the refs for bottosaurus!

Bottosaurus
Temporal range: Maastrichtian – Paleocene
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Order: Crocodilia
Family: Alligatoridae
Bottosaurus is an extinct genus of alligatoroid from the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene of New Jersey, North and South Carolina. Three species are currently known.
The genus is predominantly found from Late Cretaceous strata of Maastrichtian age, such as the Hornerstown Formation and New Jersey Greensands. New material has been found from the Rhems and Williamsburg Formations of the Black Mingo Group of the South Carolina coastal plain that dates back to the Danian and Thanetian stages of the Paleocene epoch, respectively, shows that Bottosaurus had survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event and lived through much of the early Paleogene period in these localities before finally becoming extinct somewhere around the end of the Paleocene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottosaurus

Bottosaurus Agassiz 1849 (crocodile)
Age range: 70.6 to 55.8 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=65785

OK I didn't have any luck finding a bottosaurus pic I could use so instead used another similar looking creature, a crocodyliform, Bernissartia. It's not in the same time line but it should do for a pic:

Bernissartia
Temporal range: Early Cretaceous, 130-110 Ma
Clade: Neosuchia
Family: Bernissartiidae
Genus: Bernissartia
Bernissartia ('of Bernissart') is an extinct genus of neosuchian crocodyliform that lived in the Early Cretaceous, around 130 million years ago.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernissartia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bernissartia_BW.jpg
Bernissartia fagesii from the Early cretaceous of Southern England and Belgium, digital
Attribution: Nobu Tamura aka Arthur Weasly
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Crocodyliformes
Temporal range: Late Triassic–Recent, 225–0 Ma
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Clade: Crocodyliformes
Crocodyliformes is a clade of crurotarsan archosaurs, the group often traditionally referred to as "crocodilians".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocodyliformes

And the other two animals used were Torosaurus and Ankylosaurus:

Torosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Torosaurus ("perforated lizard", in reference to the large openings in its frill) is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous period, between 68 and 66 million years ago, though it is possible that the species range might extend to as far as 69 million years ago.
From head to tail, Torosaurus is thought to have measured about 8 to 9 m (26 to 30 ft) long and weighed four to six tonnes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torosaurus

Torosaurus
Pronunciation: tor-oh-SORE-us
Name meaning: 'bull lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 70-65 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: ceratopsian
Length: 7.5m
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/torosaurus.html

Torosaurus Marsh 1891 (ceratopsid)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38861

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Torosaurus_BW.jpg
Torosaurus latus, a ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous of North America, pencil drawing, digital coloring
Attribution: Nobu Tamura
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Ankylosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Ankylosaurus is a genus of armored dinosaur. Its fossils have been found in geological formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America, making it among the last of the non-avian dinosaurs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ankylosaurus

Ankylosaurus
Pronunciation: an-KIE-loh-sore-us
Name meaning: 'stiff lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 74-67 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: armoured dinosaur
Length: 7.0m
Weight: 4000kg
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/ankylosaurus.html

Ankylosaurus Brown 1908 (ornithischian)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38837

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:202007_Ankylosaurus_magniventris.svg
Attribution: DataBase Center for Life Science (DBCLS)
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

This is the refs for bottosaurus!

Bottosaurus
Temporal range: Maastrichtian – Paleocene
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Order: Crocodilia
Family: Alligatoridae
Bottosaurus is an extinct genus of alligatoroid from the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene of New Jersey, North and South Carolina. Three species are currently known.
The genus is predominantly found from Late Cretaceous strata of Maastrichtian age, such as the Hornerstown Formation and New Jersey Greensands. New material has been found from the Rhems and Williamsburg Formations of the Black Mingo Group of the South Carolina coastal plain that dates back to the Danian and Thanetian stages of the Paleocene epoch, respectively, shows that Bottosaurus had survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event and lived through much of the early Paleogene period in these localities before finally becoming extinct somewhere around the end of the Paleocene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottosaurus

Bottosaurus Agassiz 1849 (crocodile)
Age range: 70.6 to 55.8 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=65785

OK I didn't have any luck finding a bottosaurus pic I could use so instead used another similar looking creature, a crocodyliform, Bernissartia. It's not in the same time line but it should do for a pic:

Bernissartia
Temporal range: Early Cretaceous, 130-110 Ma
Clade: Neosuchia
Family: Bernissartiidae
Genus: Bernissartia
Bernissartia ('of Bernissart') is an extinct genus of neosuchian crocodyliform that lived in the Early Cretaceous, around 130 million years ago.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernissartia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bernissartia_BW.jpg
Bernissartia fagesii from the Early cretaceous of Southern England and Belgium, digital
Attribution: Nobu Tamura aka Arthur Weasly
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Crocodyliformes
Temporal range: Late Triassic–Recent, 225–0 Ma
Superorder: Crocodylomorpha
Clade: Crocodyliformes
Crocodyliformes is a clade of crurotarsan archosaurs, the group often traditionally referred to as "crocodilians".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocodyliformes

And the other two animals used were Torosaurus and Ankylosaurus:

Torosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Torosaurus ("perforated lizard", in reference to the large openings in its frill) is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Cretaceous period, between 68 and 66 million years ago, though it is possible that the species range might extend to as far as 69 million years ago.
From head to tail, Torosaurus is thought to have measured about 8 to 9 m (26 to 30 ft) long and weighed four to six tonnes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torosaurus

Torosaurus
Pronunciation: tor-oh-SORE-us
Name meaning: 'bull lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 70-65 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: ceratopsian
Length: 7.5m
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/torosaurus.html

Torosaurus Marsh 1891 (ceratopsid)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38861

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Torosaurus_BW.jpg
Torosaurus latus, a ceratopsian from the Late Cretaceous of North America, pencil drawing, digital coloring
Attribution: Nobu Tamura
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

Ankylosaurus
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 68–66 Ma
Ankylosaurus is a genus of armored dinosaur. Its fossils have been found in geological formations dating to the very end of the Cretaceous Period, about 68–66 million years ago, in western North America, making it among the last of the non-avian dinosaurs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ankylosaurus

Ankylosaurus
Pronunciation: an-KIE-loh-sore-us
Name meaning: 'stiff lizard'
When it lived: Late Cretaceous, 74-67 million years ago
Found in: Canada, USA
Type of dinosaur: armoured dinosaur
Length: 7.0m
Weight: 4000kg
The Natural History Museum, London
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/ankylosaurus.html

Ankylosaurus Brown 1908 (ornithischian)
Age range: 70.6 to 66.043 Ma
http://fossilworks.org/bridge.pl?a=taxonInfo&taxon_no=38837

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:202007_Ankylosaurus_magniventris.svg
Attribution: DataBase Center for Life Science (DBCLS)
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.

Top
Stephen Robert Buckley
E-mail: stephen [at] greatesthoax.info
Last revised: 10 Aug 2021.
First construction: 22 Oct 2020.
Note: humour section updates differently.

Page design/construction Stephen Buckley 2020.



Image:Dead Darwin Fish
Image:Dead Darwin Fish
Image:Dead Darwin Fish